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Bulimia Case Study: A journey from the Hell of bulimia to The Beauty of full Bulimia recovery

My bulimia case study is honest. I haven't missed out stuff just to be PC or because I'm embarrassed.

This bulimia case study shows bulimia - and bulimia recovery - as it is...

I remember forcing myself to vomit for the first time when I was only 8 years old...

bulimia dangers
I was just 8 years old
when I threw up on pur-
pose for the 1st time

We had people round for a great big feast and being a kid, I couldn't keep my hands off it...

Once I'd finished my second helping of chocolate pudding, I ran outside and hid behind the huge lucky bean tree in our garden. I bent over and threw up into the bushes.

Without giving it much thought, I ran back inside to have a little more to eat.

Somehow, as a scrawny 8 year old kid, I'd developed the belief that overeating was bad and being thin was good...

I'd rationalized that if I did overeat, it was probably a good idea to throw up too.

For the next 4 years, bulimia lingered in the background of my life - like a nagging little voice that would appear from time to time.

But as I got older, that voice got louder... and louder...

At 13, puberty hit...

In what seemed like an instant, these boobs appeared on my chest... and, I developed hips! I felt like a child and wasn't ready for the body of a woman! I was devastated.

Within months, I'd discovered that by dieting, I could make my boobs and hips appear smaller. And so began the days of saying 'No, thank you' to any food that came my way...

Quite quickly, I lost weight...

But of course, dieting triggered my bulimia to hit with a vengeance... And, the binge and purge cycle signed in for a full time contract. (You'll find this in almost any bulimia case study you read - the restriction of dieting triggers an increase of binge eating!)

At 15 years old, my family was forced to leave our home in Africa and move to New Zealand...

This was a hugely traumatic time and each of my family members suffered privately in their own ways...

My way was to dive even deeper into the world of self abuse, body hatred and bulimia.

I always thought that maybe, if I could just lose a few kg's, I'd find happiness.

The weight came off - but that happiness was nowhere to be found.

As time passed, my binge eating became more out of control...

By the age of 16, I was completely and utterly obsessed with food. I would eat more or less continually throughout the day...

It was so severe that I would suffer anxiety attacks when I didn't have food on me.

Somehow, despite my obsessive eating, I managed to keep my bulimia a secret... I had become an extremely skilled liar and an actress worthy of a Golden Globe!

I could quite easily fake the perfect little life I pretended to be living. I was that lucky girl who was slim, good at sports, motivated, dedicated and boy, was she lucky to have that fast metabolism of hers!

Little did everyone know... That inside I was falling apart...

I thought I was completely crazy and that I needed to be locked away...

I was terrified that I would spend the rest of my life fighting my insane urge to eat everything - including delicacies found in the garbage!

By the time I was 20 years old, I was binging and purging over 15 times a day...

My teeth were rotting away and my body felt as though it was beginning to give up.

Sometimes my heart would flutter and the chest pains would knock me to the ground. I had severe electrolyte imbalances and I'm lucky that they didn't kill me.

By this stage, it was becoming harder and harder to keep my bulimia a secret. I couldn't even handle the 45 minute train ride home from uni without binging an purging. I'd developed the insane habit of binging in the corner of the train cabin and throwing up into my empty juice bottle. I pray to God that nobody ever saw it!

I felt deep inside me that my time to heal was now or never. I felt as though my body was on the verge of collapse... I decided it was time keep persevering until I found something that worked! I had nothing to lose...

So, at a snails pace, I began to weave my way around the rocky road of bulimia recovery...

The further I got into recovery the more exciting and beautiful the world looked...

bulimia case studyI began to feel butterflies of happiness in my tummy and I began to feel hopeful again. Each day was a challenge - but for recovery, it was a challenge I gratefully accepted!

Did I just 'click' and beat bulimia overnight? No ways. This bulimia case study didn't have an easy ending like that!

It took me 7 months before I had my first completely binge and purge free day! But, by the time one year passed, I was completely free from bulimia...

In my final year of uni, I remember walking down the sidewalk on the way to a lecture... The sun was beaming on my face, the birds were singing and the whole world felt happy. The feeling I was experiencing was peace...

And, it was beautiful.

 

It's true that bulimia casts a dark shadow over your life... But I promise you, recovery rips it off!

When bulimia is gone, you can see the world for the wonderful place it actually is! A place of opportunity, hope and happiness :)

Once bulimia leaves, you realize that dreams do come true... And life, it actually is what you make of it!

 

How Did I Beat Bulimia?

The journey to bulimia recovery was a rocky road - full of ups and downs! There was plenty of trial and error... Many things that didn't work and many that did.

It's hard to summarize a whole year of recovery into one paragraph... But simplified right down - here it is...

To beat bulimia, I re-wired the neural pathways of habit in my brain from a binge eater to a normal eater. I did this by practicing normal eating in a manageable and structured way (I call this structured eating)...

To stop myself from relapsing in the future and to make recover far easier and enjoyable, I also worked on re-wiring my neural pathway connections of self-loating to connections of self love and acceptance.

Neural pathways are basically tiny connections in our brains that through repetition develop habits... Just like the habit or brushing your teeth, or the habit of talking in a specific way. Sometimes these habits can become so strong that they are automatic - like the habit of blinking.

Bulimia is a strong habit, with strong emotional roots - there's no doubt about that. But ALL habits can be changed...

My bulimia case study has a happy ending...

I developed the habit of normal eating and self love - and I promise that you can too!

-----

Would you like help in developing your habit of normal eating and self love? I cover everything you'll need to know in my online Bulimia Recovery Program. It also comes with a supportive and private online recovery community. To learn more about my successful recovery program, click here.

Whatever you decide to do kick-start the process of re-wiring your mind - I wish you the best of luck!

You deserve happiness and freedom :)

 

 

Article by Shaye Boddington
Author of your-bulimia-recovery.com
and creator of The Bulimia Recovery Program and Community


The Bulimia Recovery Program

 

 

 

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